Matt Gilbert

"Between You and Me..." Video

A video piece for Belinda Reynolds's "Between You and Me...", composed for vibraphone, violin, and sampler. Performed with Sonic Generator (Helen Hwaya Kim, violin; Tom Sherwood, vibraphone; Jessica Peek Sherwood, sampler) on February 12, 2008.

Notes by the composer: "...Lies. Secrets. How people deal with lying is the focus of this work. In 1997, I interviewed five women, of different ages and backgrounds. Of each of them I asked the following questions: 'What is your definition of a lie?', 'Tell me about an experience in which you either lied or were lied to,' and 'Do men and women lie differently?' The tapes from these interviews became the basis for this simple, yet disturbing work. Between You and Me... was commissioned in 1997 for Twisted Tutu as part of the Common Sense Composers' Collective Fourth Annual Collaboration Project. The video projections are of original photos of the women whose voices I sampled. I decided to do an arrangement for ELECTRA in 2001, after they expressed interest in performing a recording of the piece as a pre-concert opener to one of their shows. I felt the music could work beautifully with violin and vibes, while maintaining the intimate nature of the women's voices I had recorded."

The video, mixed live during the performance, consists of five childhood photos of the women interviewed, the innocence of which is marred by the experiences of lying and being lied to, represented by falling text taken from the interview samples.

Each line of text was printed out and each piece of paper filmed as I dropped them. Everything but the text was then made transparent and then the layers of video were mixed live using Jitter.

Here are the source patches:

Live version:betweenyouandme_live_patches.zip
XML Logging version (for documenting a performance as Final Cut Pro XML):betweenyouandme_log_patches.zip

Of course, the patches won't work without the videos, but these could be useful if you're using Jitter and want to do something similar. The text layers were encoded with an alpha (opacity) layer to allow for this type of mixing.